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Bronchitis and Bronchiolitis in Infants

Acute Bronchitis or also known as Wet Lungs is a health disorder that occurs when the bronchial tract in the lungs submerged with water. Bronchial tract will then swell and produce mucus, causing coughing. Day-care attendance and exposure to cigarette smoke also can increase the likelihood that an infant will develop bronchiolitis. This disease often appears after an upper respiratory tract infection, such as a cold. Most acute bronchitis symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, etc. usually last up to 2 weeks, but the cough can persist for up to 8 weeks in some cases. Conditions that increase the risk of severe bronchiolitis include prematurity, prior chronic heart or lung disease, and a weakened immune system due to illness or medications.

Type of the other lung infections that known by the old prang is Bronchiolitis. Babies can be attacked by disease bronchiolitis (an infection caused by a virus) that can block the windpipe so that needs to be treated. Kids who have had bronchiolitis may be more likely to developasthma later in life, but it’s unclear whether the illness causes or triggers asthma, or whether children who eventually develop asthma were simply more prone to developing bronchiolitis as infants. Bronchiolitis is usually caused by a viral infection, most commonly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

Causes of Bronchitis

Some types of viruses, including: Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), Adenovirus, Influenza and Parainfluenza Bacteria (in the case of a rare) Pollutants (chemical substances in the air)

Signs and Symptoms of Bronchitis

Stuffiness Coughing up phlegm Pain in the chest Fatigue Mild headache Sores on the body Fever Watery eyes Sore throat Runny nose Mild cough Mild fever

Sometimes more severe respiratory difficulties gradually develop, marked by:

Rapid, shallow breathing A rapid heartbeat Drawing in of the neck and chest with each breath, known as retractions Flaring of the nostrils Irritability, with difficulty sleeping and signs of fatigue or lethargy

In severe cases, symptoms may worsen quickly. If you have a baby less than 3 months old and had a fever, it is wise to check with your doctor. A child with severe bronchiolitis may get fatigued from the work of breathing and have poor air movement in and out of the lungs due to the clogging of the small airways. Later the doctor will decide whether your child exposed to the acute of bronchitis, chronic bronchiolitis, or perhaps upper respiratory infections or others. After that appropriate treatment can be determined. Infants in child-care centers have a higher risk of contracting an infection that may lead to bronchiolitis because they’re in close contact with lots of other young children.

How to Prevent Acute Bronchitis?

Avoid smoking, especially around your baby Keep the hand hygiene immunization