Luka Space Health Care

Just about Health Care and Medical Reviews

You are here: Home - Russia


Tag Archives: Russia

Bladder Cancer – Global Drug Forecasts And Treatment Analysis To 2020 – Volume 1 2011

GlobalData analysis finds that the global bladder cancer therapeutics market is moderately attractive and is primarily driven by growth in the patient volume and growth in the cost of therapy. The patient volume was driven by growth in treatment usage pattern measurements such as diseased population, treatment seeking population, Diagnosed Population and prescription population.

In 2010, the bladder cancer therapeutics markets key markets (the US, UK, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Japan, Brazil, Russia, India and China) were collectively worth $610m. The markets size is driven by two key parameters, namely the patient volume and the annual cost of therapy per patient. Between 2001 and 2010, the global bladder cancer therapeutics market grew at a CAGR of 8.0%.

For Sample Pages, please click or add the below link to your browser:
http://www.globaldata.com/reportstore/RequestSamplePages.aspx?ID=Bladder-Cancer-Global-Drug-Forecasts-and-Treatment-Analysis-to-2020-Volume-1-2011&Title=Pharmaceuticals_and_Healthcare&ReportType=Industry_Report

The bladder cancer therapeutics market is completely dominated by generic drugs such as methotrexate, cisplatin, vinblastin and doxorubicin. BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Gurin) therapy and mitomycin C are the other drugs that are used for the treatment of bladder cancer.

Gemcitabine was the top-selling drug in the bladder cancer therapeutics market in 2010. The other leading drugs in the market in 2001 were BCG therapy and methotrexate which registered sales of $55m and $57m. In 2010, gemcitabine was the leading drug in the bladder cancer therapeutics market, with sales of $170m. Methotrexate and BCG therapy were the other leading therapies with sales of $145m and $131m. Between 2010 and 2020, three promising therapies, Javlor (vinflunine), Urocidin (intravesical formulation of Mycobacterial cell wall-DNA complex (MCC)) and EOquin (apaziquone), are expected to hit the market. Between 2010 and 2020, the market is expected to be led by Urocidin, with forecast sales of $386m.

GlobalData, the industry analysis specialist, has released its new report, Bladder Cancer – Global Drug Forecasts and Treatment Analysis to 2020 Volume 1 2011. The report is an essential source of information and analysis on the global bladder cancer therapeutics market. The report provides comprehensive information on bladder cancer, highlighting the treatment guidelines. It identifies and analyses the key trends shaping and driving the global bladder cancer therapeutics market. It analyses the treatment usage patterns in the global bladder cancer therapeutics market. The report also provides insights into the competitive landscape and the emerging players expected to significantly alter the positions of the existing market leaders. The report provides valuable insights into the pipeline products within the global bladder cancer sector. It quantifies the unmet need in the global bladder cancer therapeutics market as well as in the individual markets such as the US and the top five countries in Europe, highlighting the opportunity for future players.

For further details, please click or add the below link to your browser:
http://www.globaldata.com/reportstore/Report.aspx?ID=Bladder-Cancer-Global-Drug-Forecasts-and-Treatment-Analysis-to-2020-Volume-1-2011&ReportType=Industry_Report&coreindustry=Industry_Report&Title=Pharmaceuticals_and_Healthcare

Visit our report store: http://www.globaldata.com

For more details contact:
[emailprotected]
North America: +1 646 395 5477
Europe: +44 207 753 4299
+44 1204 543 533
Asia Pacific: +91 40 6616 6782

Clinical Trials of Buteyko Respiration Technique for Asthma

Breathing techniques and respiration devices become more and more popular among asthmatics and people with other respiratory problems. Among the known breathing techniques is the Buteyko breathing method, which had six randomised controlled trials in western countries.

The results were remarkable: twice less steroids, 3-10 times less reliever medication, better quality of life and less asthma symptoms, but unchanged bronchial responsiveness or lung function results after several months of breathing exercises. Meanwhile, all these studies had a major methodological flaw, which I am going to consider here.

Dr. K. Buteyko made the following clinical statements:
– Sick people, asthmatics including, breathe more air at rest than the minuscule medical norm (chronic hyperventilation). Overbreathing reduces tissue oxygenation and strengthens the desire to breathe even more.
– If they normalize their breathing pattern, then they will not require medication and will not experience their symptoms.
– The Buteyko Table of Health Zones relates breathing parameters of sick people, regardless of the name of the disease, with their current health state. This table describes parameters that reflect normal breathing (8 breaths/min for breathing frequency at rest, 6.5 percent for alveolar CO2 content, 60 seconds for stress-free breath holding time after usual exhalation, etc.). These parameters correspond to normal health and absence of asthma and many other chronic diseases since normal breathing improves body oxygenation.
– Someone has mastered the Buteyko breathing method, if his breathing parameters are normal.

Dr KP Buteyko never made claims that a particular Buteyko practitioner could achieve a particular result in relation to some group of asthmatics. Let us apply these Buteykos claims to available scientific data and the results of these randomised controlled trials.

First of all, hundreds of scientific research publications have shown that hyperventilation DIMINISHES oxygen content in body tissues.

Do asthmatics breathe much more air than the medical norm? A typical respiratory minute ventilation for an average asthmatic is about 12-15 L of air in one minute at rest (5 publications are available on my website), while the medical norm is only 6 L/min. Therefore, asthmatics breathe at rest about 2-2.5 times more air than the physiological standard.

Did asthmatics improve their breath parameters during these randomised controlled trials of the Buteyko breathing method? During the most impressive study (Bowler et al, 1998), in 3 months, use of relievers was reduced by 96 percent (25 times less ventolin) and preventers or inhaled steroids by 50%. Respiratory minute volume decreased from their initial 14 L/min to 9.6 L/min, but the physiological norm is only 6 L/min, while Dr. Buteykos hard standard is 4 L/min at rest for a 70-kg man. Hence, during their best shot, the participated asthmatics got only about a half way towards the standard. Consequently, there were a very few asthmatics, if any, who normalized their breath during these trials. They continued to hyperventilate.

The assumption of the medical doctors, who conducted these randomised controlled trials, was that a Buteyko teacher taught the Buteyko breathing method and a controlled group “learned” the method. This is easy to see from the titles, which usually say about a “trial of the Buteyko method”. How could they study the method, if no one learned it?

From a practical view, since I taught the Buteyko method to hundreds of people, the key difficulty during these randomised controlled trials were the following. The participants were mainly limited to practicing breathing exercises (e.g., 40-70 min per day). They could not use the versatile arsenal of life-style addressing tools of the Buteyko method. Breathing normalization process requires 24/7 control of breathing including:
– nasal breathing all the time (hence, it is necessary then to seal ones mouth with a surgical tape, if the mouth is usually dry in the morning; and someone will never solve their problems with asthma, if mouth breathing occurs during each night
– physical exercise (no less than 2 hours daily with only nasal breathing, in and out, otherwise exercise is more or less ineffective for most, especially sick people)
– prevention of sleeping on ones back (we breathe about two times more air, when we sleep on our backs at night)
– and various other lifestyle-related factors so that ones basal breathing pattern is restored back to our physiological standard.

Even more successful results have been discovered after application of the Frolov Breathing Device during recent clinical trails in Russia (under review and to be published in 2011).